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All reviews narrow streets ceramic tiles jewish family walk thru lots of shops beautiful area santa maria sephardic museum la blanca jewish life other cities historic sites lots of history el transito every corner rich history santo tome
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Reviewed 19 September 2018

Explore the streets, synagogues, museums, and shops. Enjoy a beverage in the lovely park overlooking the river.

Date of experience: September 2018
Thank E E
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 3 September 2018 via mobile

Near the Plaza del Salvador is the entrance to the largest Jewish quarter on the Iberian peninsula. A church called the Church of the Savior is now there atop the main Arab mosque; the Moors had scratched out the faces of the Christian Visigothic iconography. From there the cobblestone lanes widen to the Church of Santo Tome. There, you can follow the metal “Sefarad” plates (or chai) tiles on the path to the Jewish sites of interest, as also demarcated in Cordoba. The men’s white synagogue is located downhill, next to Linares antique store—opposite the cloister-monastery of San Juan de Los Reyes (which was built on the grounds of the Jewish slaughterhouse). The small synagogue was converted to a French church (Santa Maria “the White”) around 1407. It is in Almoad Moorish style, not caliphate 10th century as in Cordoba, nor Nasrid style as in Granada. The 5 naves contain capitals of pine cones. The upper frieze near the entrance has a Star of David, seen in the stained glass of the cathedral. The expulsion of Jews (starting with the pogroms of 1348) followed the Crusades and scapegoating in the 14th c...The rats that had led to 7 million killed around the Yellow River in China migrated, resulting in the Black Plague in Spain. Furthermore, the forced conversions at the turn of the 16th c. of both Jews and Moors diminished the local population. This Jewish area in Toledo is significant, because Cordoba’s synagogue (currently closed for renovations) and Segovia’s are virtually the only other “intact” remains of the earliest Jewish population on the Spanish peninsula. If you spend a day in Toledo, you can appreciate the history of the Jewish community that once thrived here. After taking a train one hour from Madrid’s Puerta de Atocha, I recommend hiring a guide. At the exit of Toledo station there are also “Toledo Pass” wristbands sold for 7 sites (€24) with guided tour and bus ride included, to/from the station. It will be about an hour’s hilly walk, mostly on cobblestones, from the point where the bus will drop off passengers far below Plaza Zodocover or town square (take the 6 escalators up and then hike)!

Date of experience: September 2018
4  Thank AnLily
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 6 August 2018

Not much left now, but a quiet section of the bustling city. Look for markers in the streets. A few nice shops.

Date of experience: May 2018
Thank Soulefulltraveler
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 31 July 2018

A history worth knowing, how much influence the Jews had in this part of Spain. Beautiful examples of clothing and artifacts and the contributions made by this well respected community.

Date of experience: June 2018
1  Thank Kim R
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 23 July 2018

Look for the tiles in the streets and on walls with "chai" and menorahs and more. The streets are so narrow and it's like a maze but there are signs of Jews having lived there throughout the area. Our private tour guide gave us so much information about the history of Jews in Spain. According to him, they lived together with Christians and Moors for about 1500 years. But starting in the 1300s, things became bad for the Jews.

If you are interested in Jewish world history, this should definitely be on your list!!

Date of experience: August 2017
Thank nancypH6606EN
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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