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how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

redraider217
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how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

there are two methods i am considering to over come the 6 hour difference from texas to dublin.

one is to adopt euro time while still here....and go to bed and wake up based on dublin time my last day in america before leaving.

the other is to just sleep and sleep and sleep every chance i get the last day and hopefully on the flight and hit the ground running.

what say you experts?

Dublin
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1. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

Adjust your wristwatch to Irish time as soon as you take off from the U.S. That way you are thinking in terms of your new time zone before you arrive.

Some people use melatonin to induce sleep during the flight (it's freely available in drugstores in the U.S., not in Europe) but make sure you are aware of its possible side-effects. And don't use it if you intend to drive when you arrive in Ireland.

redraider217
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2. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

well.....i have phenergan.....i could take that i guess

Dublin, Ireland
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3. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

And when you get there, try to stay awake until what is a reasonable 'going to bed' time here in Ireland. That way you'll get into the routine of Irish time a lot faster and recover from the journey sooner. Don't be tempted to head for a nap when you get here - your body will be looking for a full night's sleep and getting your head down for an hour or so is likely to make you feel worse, and will make it more difficult for you to adjust to the diurnal rhythms in this time zone.

Drink plenty of water during the flight and avoid alcohol (there'll be plenty of opportunities for consuming it once you're here!)as dehydration caused by a combination of flying and boozing can exacerbate any jet lag symptoms.

Huntsville, Alabama
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4. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

Red,

I used to have to travel internationally quite a bit for my last job. What I do and what works for me (and yes everyone is different) is: I don't sleep on planes, just can't do it, I may snooze a bit but that is it (and yes, I am a bad one in that I drink plenty of red wine and water on the plane). When I get to my destination I get checked into my hotel, if I can (if I can't I let them store my luggage), and then get out and WALK. Doesn't matter if it is winter in Brussels or rainy in Dublin - Walk. I walk around, have a late lunch, walk some more and force myself to stay up - have dinner and don't go to bed until about 10 pm local time. By that time I am pretty much a walking zombie, but I get on the new time quickly and don't have any issues any following nights.

Good luck!

Scunthorpe, United...
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5. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

Don't start driving straight away. Try and walk in the fresh air and keep on walking!

Eleanor

West Chicago...
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6. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

Let me echo what a lot of others have said. I've made the trip twice from Chicago (so same time zone as you) to Europe...London once and Dublin once. I can't sleep at all on the plane so I wondered how it would work out.

On the plane I limited my drinking to just juice and water and lots of them...no caffeine and no alcohol. Then on arrival in both London and Dublin, I got outside and walked! Oh, I did some indoor activities as well (attended evensong in both cities on my first day, took a museum tour), but basically I kept moving. I've read that being in the sunlight particularly helps (and remember that sunlight still gets through the clouds).

As tapl and others rightly suggest, I stayed up to around 10pm and like akandal, I was a walking (but happy) zombie. I slept hard that night and the next day my body had basically adjusted to the new time.

I would also agree with wasleys that driving on the first day is not a great idea. If you have to I'd really limit the distance. I really enjoyed my first day, but don't think I was in any condition to drive safely.

Keith

Portland
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7. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

If you're an adrenalin junkie jet lagged and driving on the opposite side of the road than you're used to is the best way to go. Especially if it's your first trip.

redraider217
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8. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

well...ive been a firefighter/paramedic for about the last 5 or 6 years so getting up in the middle of the night and/or staying up long hours and functioning is not a big problm for me

Galway, Ireland
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9. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

hi Redraider

I find Im never jetlagged / tired when coming from the US to Ireland as opposed to flying from Ireland to US. The main reason is bacause when flying from US to Ireland, you dont loose any time because timewise, Ireland is ahead of the US. But in the opposite direction, because we loose time, I find that more difficult.

Like everyone has said, change your watch to Irish time before you leave the US, drink plenty of fluids on the plane (non alcoholic), dont try to do too much the first day and have an earlyish night.

Dublin, Ireland
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10. Re: how to overcome the time change/sleep change?

Lots of good advice in this thread. On the plane try and go to sleep as soon as possible, even if you don't really want to and this means skipping food etc. Get as much sleep as possible on the plane, then when in Ireland have an easy day, but try and stay up until late evening. Things like a bus tour of Dublin can be good for day 1.

Do not plan to drive off a vast distance in a rental car after only a few hours bad sleep on a plane. Do not go to sleep for the whole afternoon o the day you arrive, as it makes it very hard to get on track.