Nature & parks in Rome

Top Parks & Nature Attractions in Rome, Italy

Nature & Parks in Rome

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What travellers are saying

  • Gubbini
    Chicago, IL174 contributions
    The Janiculum (Gianicolo) Hill (Colle) contains a large park area with pleasant walking paths, scenic overlooks, and historic monuments to those who fought for the unification of Italy. It is also where the Botanic Gardens are located. It is adjacent to both Trastevere and the Vatican yet it is pleasantly devoid of tourists. First time visitors to Rome are unlikely to make this a priority stop but returning visitors might want to see Rome from this perspective, especially on a nice day.
    Written 27 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Steve Buckley
    London, UK5,826 contributions
    My wife and myself are currently holidaying in Rome staying at the Romanico Palace Hotel (Review to follow) and a good local friend took us on a drive to see of the sights we wouldn’t ordinarily see.

    One of these involved peeping through a Keyhole from which you can see St Peter’s Basilica! What was even more interesting was that it was a rainy evening and there was a queue of people in front of us - all of whom had walked some distance for the Keyhole experience!

    As was early evening - and a wet one at that - the view was not very clear so we’ll ensure we return to the Keyhole on a nice, sunny day (when our friend informs us the queue can be 50 yards long or more!) the next time we’re in Rome!!
    Written 20 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Noraatc
    Sudbury, MA32,589 contributions
    If you want to see the Piazza del Popolo ensemble, there is no better place than Terrazza del Pincio. Very easy climb to the Villa Borghese entrance and great rewards: unobstructed views of Rome, which are especially impressive at sunset.
    Written 16 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • sandra523
    London, UK784 contributions
    Beautiful rose golden with an amazing selection in the ray of the different species of rose. Built on what was a Jewish Cemetry They have honored it in the design of a menorah. Overlooking the circus maximus. The whole front row is full of artist painting roses.
    Written 15 May 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • JennyandGemma
    Hampshire, UK96 contributions
    We were exploring Trastavere and Gianicolo and decided to get the bus up here for a picnic lunch. It’s a lovely (and HUGE) park that is well used by locals for picnics/running/dog walking etc and was a lovey setting away from the hustle and bustle of the centre.
    Written 28 October 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • NickellFamilyTravel
    Los Angeles, CA2,221 contributions
    The Orange tree garden is perched at the top of the Aventine hill. Also known as parko sevalo. If you were to ever have it be empty at sunset it would be an incredibly romantic evening. However the secret is out and it is a great spot for taking pictures at sunset and viewing the old city of Rome.
    Written 7 July 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,321 contributions
    The Parco degli Acquedotti is an urban green area of Rome.
    It is included between the Appio Claudio district, via delle Capannelle and the Rome-Cassino-Naples railway line, covering an area of approximately 240 hectares.
    The name derives from the presence on the surface or underground of seven Roman and papal aqueducts which supplied the ancient Rome.
    When we visited the site, we admired and enjoyed seductive landscapes of wild and still untouched nature.
    Certainly it is one of the most fascinating parks in Rome.
    It is enclosed between Via Appia and Via Tuscolana, between the scenic attractions of the Roman countryside up to the area of the Castelli Romani, in an atmosphere as it has been frozen in time, extremely enjoyable in the pink light of the sunset, when the imposing arches of the Claudio and Felice aqueducts, framed by pine trees, stand out against the sun in all their suggestive and evocative beauty.
    Rich in history, the Parco degli Acquedotti is one of the green lungs of the city and is part of the Suburban Regional Park of the Appia Antica.
    Its name derives from the fact that here was the hub of the water network of ancient Rome, where the aqueducts that supplied the capital with water, the immense patrician villas, the baths and the fountains intersected, joined and overlapped.
    Highly recommended.
    Written 26 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tillyfour
    Camberley, UK45 contributions
    Good selection of animals, bigger than I thought. Some animals could definitely do with more stimulating environment and nicer cage but not that different to other zoos I have been to. Cafe was expensive and long queues but overall had a good day.
    Written 3 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • meandros
    St. Pete Beach, FL625 contributions
    Not closed to traffic on Sunday. So many blogs said go on Sunday. No. This is not what you want, it is not made a pedestrian street on Sunday. In fact the first part that is pedestrian is closed on Sunday. So there is more traffic on Sunday than other days. The tourist office looked at me like I was insane, no it is not closed to cars. The first part closest to Rome where the Museum and visitor center is is scary, it is like walking through a tunnel. The walls are high on each side there is no sidewalk and there is lots of fast two way traffic.

    If I went again I would go during the week, take the pedestrian rode from the visitor center to San Sebastian which I could not accès on Sunday. Or I would take the bus further down to parts of the road where there is only some local traffic and the conditions are bad enough to discourage drivers.

    Bus 118 from Piazza Venezia goes along the road and stops in a few pints then cuts out to the new point. This is easy to use as a one way walk. Biking in the heavy traffic seems perilous and the paths aren't great for it often little room between trees and walls, spots people were carrying their bike through water. We walked the first 6km and I was happy with that choice.
    Written 22 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,321 contributions
    The Villa Torlonia is a public park in Rome, located in the Nomentana district.
    The monumental entrance to the villa is located on Via Nomentana and has two small temples on Ionic columns and two lanterns surmounted by eagles on the uprights of the wrought iron gate.
    In the 17th and 18th centuries, this place was owned by the Pamphilj family who had a farm there.
    The villa was built in 1806 by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier for Giovanni Torlonia, the banker who bought the land in 1797, and was completed by his son Alessandro.
    Valadier transformed the two existing buildings (the main building and the Abbati casino) into what is currently the Palace and the Casino dei Principi. He also built the stables and an atrium, reorganized the park and the villa was decorated with sculptures of ancient art.
    Alessandro Torlonia continued his father's work by commissioning Giovan Battista Caretti for the improvements of the villa and the construction of new buildings.
    He raised a temple of Saturn, fake ancient ruins, the Tribune with a fountain, an amphitheater and other things that no longer exist today.
    In the southern part, basins, paths and new buildings were built.
    In 1842, two obelisks were erected in memory of Alessandro Torlonia's parents.
    Other exotic buildings were also built, including the Swiss hut (now the Casina delle Civette), built by neoclassical architect Giuseppe Jappelli from Venice, a false Etruscan tomb, honorary columns and other garden decorations.
    In the 1920s, Giovanni Torlonia junior granted official residence to Benito Mussolini and his family.
    The house was also bombed during the Second World War.
    In 1978 the villa was finally purchased by the Municipality of Rome which transformed it into a public park.
    Its historic buildings house the museums of Villa Torlonia.
    Villa Torlonia is the real jewel of Via Nomentana, it offers well-kept green spaces, architecture, museums, but also a museum for children.
    The splendid 17th century villa, owned by the wealthiest families of the capital over the centuries, houses the Casina delle Civette, which is truly one of the things to see in Rome.
    The building is a sort of tiny medieval village, which look like an alpine hut and offers the visitor some wonderful stained glass windows.
    In the other buildings surrounded by greenery we can find temporary exhibitions often free, but also a museum dedicated to new technologies for the little ones.
    Currently the exhibition of the works of the famous Italian sculptor Francesco Messina ("Francesco Messina : Novecento Contemporaneo") is set up in the Casino dei Principi.
    The Casino Nobile and the Casina delle Civette are currently used as a museum while in the Limonaia there is a municipal museum of technology dedicated to children.
    It is not long ago that the restoration work began to bring out the original magnificence of the buildings and the park.
    Nowadays, off the beaten tourist circuits, the estate, where Mussolini's former residence was located, is a jewel case of treasures to be discovered.
    Of course it is also a favorite destination for many Romans who love jogging along its magnificent paths.
    Recommended.
    Written 8 July 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Vadim
    Murmansk, Russia25,355 contributions
    The waters of the Tiber made the island look like a boat. By the way, the only island along the entire length of the river. Usually a fortress is created on the island, around which the city is already growing. Such as in Paris around Cite, in Moscow or in New York around Manhattan. It turned out differently in Rome. Tiberina turned out to be on the contrary a place where they did not want to settle. There is a legend that the body of the Roman tyrant king Tarquin the Proud was allegedly buried here. Subsequently, the strategy of psychological repression continued to operate. Here the Romans organized a hospital for plague patients - the temple of Aesculapius. Gradually, the island ceases to be a cursed place and acquires a high status. The temple of Aesculapius has not survived to this day. In its place, in 988, the Holy Roman Emperor Otto III created the Church of St. Bartholomew.Otto approached the matter thoroughly, even transporting the remains of the apostle here. Imaginary or real is the question. However, the church that we see has nothing to do with the original one. Otto's church was washed away by a flood in 1557. The current one was built in 1624. In addition to the church, there was even a papal residence in the Torre dei Pierleoni, which now doesn`t make an impression comparable to, for example, the castle of Sant'Angelo. After the flood , the Romans remembered the original medical glory of the island and the hospital was opened here in 1584 . With the wonderful name Ospedale Fatebenefratelli ("Brothers, do good"). In addition, you can look at the bridges. They are the oldest here. However, only one arch remains of the oldest Ponte Rotto. The bridges leading to the island from the Jewish ghetto are called Ponte Fabricio, and the one leading to Trastevere is Ponte Cestio. They were also built before BC, but subsequently rebuilt many times and it is difficult to distinguish the antique part in them.
    Written 21 November 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Liz
    Chicago, IL456 contributions
    If you are a sucker for killer views then this is your place to go.

    Through the keyhole you immediately see Malta (the Embassy), then you see Italy, followed by Vatican City (yes it is it's own country!).

    The views from the keyhole are so pretty, definately a good spot to check out.

    If you walk there, there are also some great views on the way up and down overlooking Rome. Photos of keyhole and some from the walk included in my review.
    Written 22 July 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AMohsen
    Port Said, Egypt410 contributions
    Tiber River is one of the popular European rivers that passes through Rome, and all visitors will see it inevitably whilst crossing its picturesque bridges. However, it looks shallow and dark a little bit at night, and never observed boats or cruise in it.
    Written 27 January 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Noraatc
    Sudbury, MA32,589 contributions
    My Palazzo Farnese tour in English was pre-booked for 5PM and I joined the line for the security check at 4:40PM. The Palazzo belongs to the French Embassy, so needless to say that security check was very thorough. Actually, there were two security checks: one outside and another one inside. Do not carry big bags!!!

    The tour was pretty interesting, but the interior did not strike me as something out of the ordinary by Rome's standards. The rooms are empty because all the precious collections of the Farnese family are in Naples now. However, there are two highlights which certainly made the visit very special.

    1. The Room of Maps with spectacular frescoes by Annibale Carracci and his school: "The Love of Gods"

    2. The exterior and the courtyard designed by Antonio da Sangallo. Michelangelo also contributed to some elements of the architectural design of this magnificent palazzo.

    And for me personally this visit meant one more thing: the second act of one of my favorite operas, Puccini's "Tosca" takes place in Palazzo Farnese. This is where Tosca kills the evil chief of police, Scarpia, who tortured and condemned to death her lover, the painter Mario Cavaradossi.
    Written 9 February 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Leslie W
    Poughkeepsie, NY842 contributions
    This was a lovely discovery as we wandered from the Vatican City area through Trastevere. The printed brochure available at the ticket office provides good guidance for touring the garden, and it is easily navigable, even with a few areas that require steps or a climb. This is an oasis in the midst of a busy city, with specimens clearly labelled. Plan on spending 1 - 1 1/2 hours for your visit.
    Written 18 October 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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