Sligo Historic Sites

Historic Sites in Sligo, Ireland

Sligo Historic Sites

Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
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24 places sorted by traveller favourites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
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Historic Sites • Points of Interest & Landmarks
Historic Sites • Points of Interest & Landmarks

What travellers are saying

  • Lois A
    Fredericksburg, VA188 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Lots of ruins of abbeys in Ireland. That is for sure. This was another good one. Well worth seeing.
    Written 8 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jackie D
    17 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful peaceful little place of reflection. Rosary is said here every evening in May.
    Must see if you are passing through.
    Written 21 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • bitiao2016
    Enniskillen, UK39 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    A visit to this beautiful, historical house is a must for fans of Irish history. Paul was a great tour guide, lively and personable. The tour itself however was perhaps a little rushed. The numbers on the tour were also quite large - I would suggest too large. It's also a pity that the house isn't in state ownership - as it's privately owned, the entire upstairs is off-limits.

    The coach house has been turned into tea rooms, and although the space itself looks pretty, on a cold, wet and windy July day, the high ceilings and bare walls meant it was cold and uncomfortable to spend a few hours in before our tour started. There were also limited refreshments available - just a couple of traybakes, and tea and coffee.
    Written 7 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sue W
    Bolton, UK284 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    So much history, it’s a very short walk off the side of the main road. Walk up the path near the tree full of rubbish
    Written 30 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cliodhna73
    Sligo, Ireland14 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A beautiful but poignant reminder of Irish island life. Well worth a visit, especially on a clear day.
    Written 19 May 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Joan S
    Chicago, IL71 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    My husband included this stop in the itinerary for our trip to Ireland as a surprise to me. This is a spectacular Italian style garden parked right in the middle of rural Ireland. The house and garden are open for tours but we did not tour the house. The waterfall is a small separate charge and a drive up the road from the gardens, but worth it. Avoca mills has concessions here. There is a nice gift shop and Avoca cafe. An audio tour is available that you can download with a QR code. You may want to have earphones, but it is not absolutely necessary, as most of the time you will be walking through the gardens on your own. However, I can imagine that this place is much more crowded in the summer time or during the tulip festival. Allow at least 2 hours, more if you want to have a picnic.
    Written 1 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sheila Fowler
    Seattle, WA205 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This was a surprise. Heapstown Cairn is really in a field behind a home. It is a hidden gem and our group had it to ourselves the entire time we were there. Trees, herbs and cairns. I highly recommend a stop here.
    Written 28 October 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • waterbath
    Singapore, Singapore108 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    It’s a highly historical site. Our guide mentioned that despite it being an friary built hundreds of years ago. There are still people laid to rest here. So definitely be respectful of the area. He also pointed out the stairs going up to the second floor of the friary, which was reaaaaally cool.

    There are small stone rooms within the friary and one, with a little statue of Mother Mary in it.
    Written 19 June 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • froggy724
    Hudson, WI172 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Worth the stop, it will move you deeply. The graveyard for children brought tears. such a beautiful stop.
    Written 18 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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    Sligo, Ireland344 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Green Fort is located at Forthill overlooking Sligo and the Sligo harbour area. In ancient times following the arrival of the first settlers in Ireland this fortification was a regular ringed fort which was used by the early settlers to protect livestock and crops as well as the family who lived there from human mauraders and wild animals such as wolves.

    Prior to the Williamite wars in Ireland (1688 to 1691) perhaps as far back as 1620 the ring fort was converted into the current structure which can be seen today which is a star-shaped fort.

    The construction materials were sods hence the name Green Fort to differentiate it from the Stone Fort which was located on the site of the present civil building of the Town Hall.

    The Sod Fort would have been the name used for the Green Fort as to differentiate it from the Stone Fort that used to be where the town hall now stands.

    The fort was used to defend the town from the northern side and the harbour also. In 1690 the Fort was repaired and the Jacobite leader, Col Teague O'Reagan, a Cork man decided to abandon the stone Fort and strengthen the defences of the Green Fort.

    In mid 1691 the Williamites attacked Sligo with a force of about 10,000. A long a hard battle was fought and eventually a surrender was negotiated on the basis that the defenders would be unharmed. Following the Williamite wars the fort was abandoned.

    Although the fort is of great historical importance some of the land on which the fort stands was turned into housing by the Town Council and while housing is important so is the historical heritage. Visitors to the Green Fort are amazed by the scenic views. The harbour, Knocknarea mountain, Benbulben Mand the Dartry mountains, Glencar as well as Sligo town itself can be seen from the top.

    The approaches to the fort are a bit steep but the climb is worth the slight effort. As the fort is a grassy structure it would be useful to wear wellington boots or gum boots or some similar footwear.
    Written 18 February 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • shayf1957
    Westport, Ireland3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Discover the tragic history of the three Spanish Armada ships and there unlucky crews in the Grange Spanish Armada Centre. Wrecked in a storm in September 1588 at Streedagh Strand nearby. Learn about the adventures in Ireland of Francisco de Cuellar, an Armada Captain who survived and returned to Spain via Scotland and the Netherlands. A true story of hardships overcome and survival in 16 century Ireland.
    Written 25 July 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Rodney B
    Waukesha, WI1,160 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Hiked this trail to the court tomb with some friends. It's uphill at first. Interesting court tomb site. The trail goes past a stone wall as well before following a logging road. Overall not amazing, but worth it to see an easy to reach court tomb. There is parking at the deer park trailhead. I couldn't find a closer place to park.

    Written 27 May 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cathal
    3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    In 1989, Archaeologist, Geraldine Stout surveyed Lisnalurg ceremonial enclosure. It lies just over a kilometre from Sligo Bay and about 6 kilometres from the famed Neolithic Passage Tomb complex of Carrowmore. The monument does share features with the classic Henge of Scotland, Wales and England, but this monument takes that to the extreme.

    It is a 150m diameter, 25m wide, 5m high circular embankment with a hollowed interior containing an 11m wide, 2.5m high second circular earthwork around 75m in diameter. An entrance, 9m wide can be found to the south-west of the external bank, mirrored by another entrance in the smaller enclosure. There is no evidence of a fosse (archaeological term for a ditch), as the hollowed out interior makes up the material in both banks. It is clear that even in its worn state today, the monument commands attention due to its sheer scale. How would it have looked 5,000 year ago.

    It is not clear what the monument was used for in the past. It has not been archaeologically excavated and therefore we do not know its exact age or the artefact/ecofacts that may lie within. Based on monuments of a similar plan, it would appear to be a ceremonial monument.

    The monument is located on private land and so it is important to ask permission of the landowner who lives in the 2 storey house next door. There is a golf course next door on the opposite side of the monument from the house.
    Written 10 August 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Kristen R
    Pensacola, FL9 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    One of the least visited and thus more original sites in Waterville is that of Church Island. Church island sits in the middle of Lough Currane (Waterville Lake) and can only be accessed by hiring a boat locally. We hired Ann Mc Carthy's husband the owner of the Currane Lodge to give us a personal tour of the island. On the island you will find the remains of an old Irish monastery dating back to around the 12th century built in Romanesque style. You don’t have to be into architecture to appreciate the craftsmanship and dedication that went into the building of the church. Also located on the island is St Fininas Cell believed to be associated with the sixth century saint known as Fionan Cam (Fionan the Squint-eyed).
    Written 28 July 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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    Sligo, Ireland344 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is where the Battle of the Books took place in 561 AD between armies led by St Columcille and the High King. It was a copyright dispute brought about by Columcille copying a book created by Finian. The High King stated "to every cow it's calf and to ever book it's copy." As Columcille did not agree a fierce and bloody battle was founght at this location. As a result of which Columcille went into exile on the island of Iona.
    Written 14 October 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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