Campanile di San Martino

Campanile di San Martino, Castelveccana: Address, Campanile di San Martino Reviews: 5/5

Campanile di San Martino
5
What people are saying
A befry with history
Jul 2018
In the cemetery of Nasca there is a solitary bell tower of rough gray stone: it is what remains of the ancient church of San Martino di Saltirana. It must have been a rather small and rustic church, of a Romanesque style such as San Giorgio di Sarigo and therefore presumably built around the XXII century. In it they gathered for their religious functions the village of Saltirana and the inhabitants of a vanished village that then was in the plain between Saltirana and Canova. That village was destroyed in 1277 by northern soldiers. Its inhabitants that were looted and decimated by the invaders and the plague that followed, abandoned everything and moved to a nearby hill where they founded Nasca. The church of San Martino fell into disuse. In 1574 San Carlo, on a pastoral visit to the Pieve of Travaglia, so he had his secretary Bascapè write down the state of San Martino: "the church has rough walls and worked stones; it is without a door ... "It was during one of the repeated visits to the Pieve that, in August 1581, Carlo Borromeo sensed the first symptoms of his long and inexorable evil: seventeen attacks of tertian fever that stopped him at Domo for about a month . Convalescent he used to go on foot in the woods of Sarigo, where he quenched his thirst in a spring that is still called "Fonte di San Carlo". In 1786, at the decision of the parish priest of Domo Giovanni Battista Isabella, he demolished the small church keeping only the bell tower

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

5.0
2 reviews
Excellent
2
Very good
0
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Ivan S
195 contributions
Jul 2018 • Solo
In the cemetery of Nasca there is a solitary bell tower of rough gray stone: it is what remains of the ancient church of San Martino di Saltirana. It must have been a rather small and rustic church, of a Romanesque style such as San Giorgio di Sarigo and therefore presumably built around the XXII century. In it they gathered for their religious functions the village of Saltirana and the inhabitants of a vanished village that then was in the plain between Saltirana and Canova. That village was destroyed in 1277 by northern soldiers. Its inhabitants that were looted and decimated by the invaders and the plague that followed, abandoned everything and moved to a nearby hill where they founded Nasca. The church of San Martino fell into disuse. In 1574 San Carlo, on a pastoral visit to the Pieve of Travaglia, so he had his secretary Bascapè write down the state of San Martino: "the church has rough walls and worked stones; it is without a door ... "It was during one of the repeated visits to the Pieve that, in August 1581, Carlo Borromeo sensed the first symptoms of his long and inexorable evil: seventeen attacks of tertian fever that stopped him at Domo for about a month . Convalescent he used to go on foot in the woods of Sarigo, where he quenched his thirst in a spring that is still called "Fonte di San Carlo". In 1786, at the decision of the parish priest of Domo Giovanni Battista Isabella, he demolished the small church keeping only the bell tower
Written 1 August 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Campanile di San Martino