Memorial to the Unknown Victims of Prisons and War Camps GULAG

Memorial to the Unknown Victims of Prisons and War Camps GULAG, Yekaterinburg

Memorial to the Unknown Victims of Prisons and War Camps GULAG

Memorial to the Unknown Victims of Prisons and War Camps GULAG
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Alex J
Melbourne, Australia2,208 contributions
One of the most impressive memorials I have seen anywhere! Unmissable!
Sep 2018 • Friends
This important memorial is dedicated to victims of the gulags. It is said that up to 20,000 people are buried nearby in mass graves, and there are many such mass graves all over the former Soviet Union. The whole complex takes some time to walk around, there is much to see. The single most impressive item is the huge statue of two masks, side by side. One face looking towards Asia and the other looking looking towards Europe. You will see tears, which look like heads. Perhaps the most unusual work of art I have seen in my whole life! There are several names of people who are said to be killed near this location. A truly unmissable memorial. This memorial is on the way to the Europe/Asia monument, it is very easy to see it.
Written 5 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Andrew M
7,144 contributions
Emotional tribute
Aug 2018 • Family
We had traveled extensively in Siberia, and visited many political repression monuments, but thought that this was the best. We visited it as part of a city tour. It is off the main bus routes, so you will need a taxi or arrange a tour to this area.It is a very emotional complex which is said to hold the remains of close to 20,000 persons in mass graves. On entry to the complex, the first monument that you will see, is the "masks of sorrow". This is a powerful symbol, as tears are running down the face of each bronze mask, which are strategically joined so that one mask faces Asia and the other Europe. If you look closely, one mask has Slavic features with a high cheekbone, and the other, softer Asian features.The sculptor was Ernst Neizvestny, who unfortunately died the year before the sculpture was installed here.

The most noticeable symbol of the complex is the tall black cross, which is a short walk away from the masks. The main memorial area is divided into seven segments which contain short walls with marble plaques listing approximately 18,000 names of persons who were executed at this site. The remainder of persons that are unidentified or who died in the gulags, are honoured by a symbolic grey grave marker, which has an image of lit candles to the right and the symbols of the affected religious communities to the left i.e. muslim, catholic, orthodox christianity and jewish. The central monument of this memorial area is cube shaped and has a short tapered top. A wreath sculpture is at the top of the cube, and all four sides have the symbols of the religions mentioned above.

During the 1930's when the "great purge" was being done, persons could be arrested without evidence and if they were lucky would be sent to gulags, but if they were deemed a "threat to society", would be shot and dumped in mass graves, similar to this site. The 30th October is recognised as political repression day in Russia. There are additional plans to add other political repression memorials to the complex and the "last address sign" initiative has also been recently started in Yekaterinburg.
Written 23 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

CorvettePete
Belconnen, Australia1,219 contributions
Stop here before Europe/Asia
Sep 2018 • Friends
This moving memorial is located about a kilometre or so before the obelisk that marks the border between Europe and Asia. Make sure that you stop here and have a look around if you are heading towards the obelisk. The memorial remembers the many people who “disappeared” from the area during the reign of Stalin. In addition to a statue is a wall with the names of all of those who they have identified from Government records. This is an important part of Russian history that should not be forgotten.
Written 13 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Peter G
Tarporley, UK663 contributions
Peter G
Sep 2018 • Friends
Incredibly thought provoking, a memorial to 18,000 of Stalin’s victims at the site of a mass grave discovered some years ago. Most were murdered in 1938-45
Written 22 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Andrew E
White Bear Lake, MN705 contributions
This will live with me forever
Oct 2017 • Solo
Outside of town a road construction crew in the 1980's found a mass grave. In time it was determined that these were the remains of 18,500 local people secretly executed by the police as part of the political purges of 1936-1938. Impossible to individually identify the remains, the memorial does list the names of those who were "disappeared" in those years, and presumably are among those buried here. It is significant to note that 18,500 is also the number of soldiers from the Yekaterinburg area who dies during World War II.

The memorial is respectful and chilling at the same time. Important to quietly visit to contemplate the terror that governments can carry out against their own citizens.
Written 22 November 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Bill A
Arlington, VA75 contributions
A modest but important memorial
Jul 2017 • Friends
If you go to the Asia/Europe marker, be sure to stop here for a sober reminder of the many thousands who died in prison camps during Stalin's rule.
Written 15 August 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Chris M
Canberra, Australia275 contributions
A sad legacy to many who died
Sep 2016 • Couples
My husband and I travelled on the Trans-Siberian Railway from Vladivostok to Moscow. We stopped off at Irkutsk, Yekateringburg and Kazan. During our few days in Ekateringburg, our guide, Konstantin drove us to this Gulag Memorial. It is believed that up to 20,000 people were taken from their homes, killed here and buried in mass graves in the forests off what is now the major highway between Yekateringburg and Moscow. There are many wreaths and other floral tributes, so clearly these people are remembered and honoured. This is a sad place to visit like visiting a concentration camp. It is a reminder of a few people's inhumanity to their fellow men and women. We need reminders of our dark past, so we learn from those mistakes and hopefully, not make them again.
Written 12 January 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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