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Jana C wrote a review Sep 2017
Prague, Czech Republic3,881 contributions699 helpful votes
We walked pass this gate many times during our stay in Ardfert. The problem is it leads nowhere and doesn't seem to fit any purpose apart the "what is it for now, what was it for before". Nice to look at anyway.
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Date of experience: August 2017
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SirNorman wrote a review Jul 2016
County Cork, Ireland564 contributions318 helpful votes
Ardfert is small village only a few kilometres from Tralee. As you approach the village your eye is drawn to the huge structure that is the Cathedral ruin that overshadows the village. The second thing that catches your eye as you arrive is a grand limestone battlemented crescent Gateway entrance. Once you realise that this striking ornamental entrance leads nowhere your curiosity is aroused. The gateway was built c.1815, by John Crosbie Earl of Glandore as an imposing entrance to his mansion and estate. However this is not its original location as it was previously located further into the estate and was relocated to its present position c. 1880. The centre point of the imposing battered limestone entrance is a pair of smooth limestone ashlar piers with a lancet arch in the centre and ornamental double-leaf cast-iron gates with a crest. Attached is a two-bay single-storey flat-roofed Gothic Revival style gate lodge, originally built in 1815. Ironically this imposing entrance leads nowhere as the grand mansion is gone, burned down in 1922, and the estate subsequently divided. However as an entrance it is quite spectacular and like the Cathedral it too looks a bit of an anachronism in the small village. Subsequent to the grand entrance being relocated a Fountain was installed directly opposite at the centre of the village by a later inheritor of the estate. It was intended to honour his ancestor but had the advantage of giving great relief to the villagers who now had a water supply. Today with its function altered with concrete bricks and a sad looking tap installed it seems unfortunate that this nice feature is not functioning properly as would be appropriate to the once residential seat of a powerful Earl.
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Date of experience: May 2016
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