Oratorio di San Bernardino

Oratorio di San Bernardino, Perugia

Oratorio di San Bernardino
4.5
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Brun066
By Brun066
The most precious Renaissance work in Perugia
May 2019
The artist Agostino di Duccio (1417-1481) worked on the facade of this Oratory (by far the most splendid part of the building) for four years, since 1457 until 1461. The result is a work enchanting for carving quality, in particular for the very refined draperies dressing the characters: it's one of the most memorable carving works of the fifteenth century in Italy, and certainly it's the most precious Renaissance work in Perugia. The sculptures are influenced by the innovation introduced by Donatello, the scholars call "stiacciato": in modern Italian "schiacciato", ie crushed. The term means a sculpture in which the reliefs rise a few millimeters above the surface, so as to appear almost more like a painting. By this way, it's also possible to apply the artifice of perspective to the figures. But the "stiacciato" technique is here interpreted in an original way by Agostino, particularly emphasizing the curved lines of the figures and above all of the clothes they wear: these feature thick and parallel folds: an essay of technical ability, which we would never tire of admiring. Whoever knows the reliefs by Agostino at the Malatesta Temple in Rimini, will recognize strong similarities between the two works; and in fact Agostino works in Perugia immediately after Rimini. Not only: here Agostino is also the author of the architectural part, ie the facade, then he is influenced by the powerful personality of Leon Battista Alberti, who at the Malatesta Temple had given an eloquent essay about the original way in which he interpreted the architectural lesson of ancient Roman age. The delicate polychromy adds charm to the splendor of the architectural-sculptural façade complex: here soft versions of red and green colours prevail. Overall, due to the references that it allows to both of these two great artists, such as Donatello and Leon Battista Alberti, and to the value in itself shown by Agostino di Duccio, this is a Renaissance work that doesn't resemble any other of all those I have ever seen, and which isn't to be missed by those visiting Perugia

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Brun066
Florence, Italy10,180 contributions
The most precious Renaissance work in Perugia
May 2019 • Couples
The artist Agostino di Duccio (1417-1481) worked on the facade of this Oratory (by far the most splendid part of the building) for four years, since 1457 until 1461. The result is a work enchanting for carving quality, in particular for the very refined draperies dressing the characters: it's one of the most memorable carving works of the fifteenth century in Italy, and certainly it's the most precious Renaissance work in Perugia.
The sculptures are influenced by the innovation introduced by Donatello, the scholars call "stiacciato": in modern Italian "schiacciato", ie crushed. The term means a sculpture in which the reliefs rise a few millimeters above the surface, so as to appear almost more like a painting. By this way, it's also possible to apply the artifice of perspective to the figures.
But the "stiacciato" technique is here interpreted in an original way by Agostino, particularly emphasizing the curved lines of the figures and above all of the clothes they wear: these feature thick and parallel folds: an essay of technical ability, which we would never tire of admiring.
Whoever knows the reliefs by Agostino at the Malatesta Temple in Rimini, will recognize strong similarities between the two works; and in fact Agostino works in Perugia immediately after Rimini.
Not only: here Agostino is also the author of the architectural part, ie the facade, then he is influenced by the powerful personality of Leon Battista Alberti, who at the Malatesta Temple had given an eloquent essay about the original way in which he interpreted the architectural lesson of ancient Roman age.
The delicate polychromy adds charm to the splendor of the architectural-sculptural façade complex: here soft versions of red and green colours prevail.
Overall, due to the references that it allows to both of these two great artists, such as Donatello and Leon Battista Alberti, and to the value in itself shown by Agostino di Duccio, this is a Renaissance work that doesn't resemble any other of all those I have ever seen, and which isn't to be missed by those visiting Perugia
Written 4 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Emily D
45 contributions
Worth seeing for the door of Agostino di Duccio bas-reliefs!
May 2016 • Couples
Take the Via dei Priori from the central piazza and walk for 8
minutes to the Oratorio to see Agostino di Duccio - a terrific
sculptor from the 15th century - his bas-reliefs are amazing!
Written 17 May 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Steve
Gallup, NM86 contributions
This is one of many beautiful churches in Perugia. It's within walking distance of the old city.
Sep 2015
Perugia is a city full of history. This church is like many others in that community - full of memorable sites within walking distance of the old city. Not far up the street is a great pizzeria.
Written 10 December 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
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