Plaza Blas Infante

Plaza Blas Infante, Estepona: Address, Plaza Blas Infante Reviews: 4/5

Plaza Blas Infante
4
What people are saying
Turista-Inglesa
By Turista-Inglesa
A square to honour the Father of Andalucia
Dec 2014
. This is the square directly in front of the Casa del Aljibe – the former Town Hall and now the Museo Arqueologico de Estepona. It is named after Blas Infante - the "Father of Andalucia" as he is known, who was born up the road in the little white-washed town of Casares, but executed, precisely for his Andalusian views, in the Spanish Civil War. This square is in memory of him; the green and white striped flag of Andalucia was his invention, so there is more than one way of remembering him. Have you noticed how, on the seafront promenade, there are green and white stripes marking the steps down to the beach? The square is nice a nice spot to sit and rest, or read a book, as it is quiet (surrounded by mainly pedestrian streets, and shady with trees. You'll also see there one of the pretty ceramic plaques with a poem on it - part of the Ruta de la Poesia. And look at the handsome house - it's the town museum. It is worth going into the building even if you don’t want to see the museum exhibits, as it is built in the typical 18th century style of a rich gentleman's dwelling. You start with a large entrance porch, called a Zaguan. Traditionally these have been considered part of the street rather than the house, and so in the past beggars or vendors might set up there, and people had no compunction about sheltering inside out of the occasional winter rainstorm. The Zaguan always leads to a central patio, here we have a beautiful example. In the centre is the well leading to the "aljibe" after which the house was named - a very old water storage tank said to date back to Moorish times. If you are not quite sure, Moorish times here in Andalusia refers to the period between 711 and 1492 when the Muslim Caliphs of Cordoba and Emirs of Granada ruled. Over 700 years of Islamic history – the Romans were in Britain for only 400 years. All around the patio at first-floor level is a beautiful balcony, now glassed in but originally open to the patio. This balcony is in fact the corridor giving access to the rooms at that level; a handsome staircase leads up there. Traditionally, the maids lived further up above in the attics, rooms too hot in winter and too cold in summer for the ladies and gentlemen to inhabit! Here the patio has been enclosed by an attractive glass roof; when first built, this was open to the sky. The square itself is very attractive, with flowers, a statue and a cannon. It is surrounded by a balcony-like balustrade painted in the traditional ochre-yellow and white. Just across the road are several pleasant bars for refreshment. A delightful pausing point before you continue your walk around beautiful Estepona! .

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours and Tickets

4.0
5 reviews
Excellent
1
Very good
4
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Turista-Inglesa
Estepona, Spain26,515 contributions
A square to honour the Father of Andalucia
Dec 2014 • Friends
.

This is the square directly in front of the Casa del Aljibe – the former Town Hall and now the Museo Arqueologico de Estepona.

It is named after Blas Infante - the "Father of Andalucia" as he is known, who was born up the road in the little white-washed town of Casares, but executed, precisely for his Andalusian views, in the Spanish Civil War. This square is in memory of him; the green and white striped flag of Andalucia was his invention, so there is more than one way of remembering him. Have you noticed how, on the seafront promenade, there are green and white stripes marking the steps down to the beach?

The square is nice a nice spot to sit and rest, or read a book, as it is quiet (surrounded by mainly pedestrian streets, and shady with trees. You'll also see there one of the pretty ceramic plaques with a poem on it - part of the Ruta de la Poesia.

And look at the handsome house - it's the town museum. It is worth going into the building even if you don’t want to see the museum exhibits, as it is built in the typical 18th century style of a rich gentleman's dwelling. You start with a large entrance porch, called a Zaguan. Traditionally these have been considered part of the street rather than the house, and so in the past beggars or vendors might set up there, and people had no compunction about sheltering inside out of the occasional winter rainstorm.

The Zaguan always leads to a central patio, here we have a beautiful example. In the centre is the well leading to the "aljibe" after which the house was named - a very old water storage tank said to date back to Moorish times. If you are not quite sure, Moorish times here in Andalusia refers to the period between 711 and 1492 when the Muslim Caliphs of Cordoba and Emirs of Granada ruled. Over 700 years of Islamic history – the Romans were in Britain for only 400 years.

All around the patio at first-floor level is a beautiful balcony, now glassed in but originally open to the patio. This balcony is in fact the corridor giving access to the rooms at that level; a handsome staircase leads up there. Traditionally, the maids lived further up above in the attics, rooms too hot in winter and too cold in summer for the ladies and gentlemen to inhabit!

Here the patio has been enclosed by an attractive glass roof; when first built, this was open to the sky.

The square itself is very attractive, with flowers, a statue and a cannon. It is surrounded by a balcony-like balustrade painted in the traditional ochre-yellow and white. Just across the road are several pleasant bars for refreshment.

A delightful pausing point before you continue your walk around beautiful Estepona!

.
Written 9 January 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing